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Scouting in Alabama

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Scouting in Alabama has a long history, from the 1910s to the present day, serving thousands of youth in programs that suit the environment in which they live.

Early history (1910-1950)

Until 1948, some southern councils of the Boy Scouts of America were racially segregated. Colored Troops, as they were officially known, were given little support from Districts and Councils. Some Scouting executives and leaders believed that Colored Scouts and Leaders would be less able to live up to the ideals of the Boy Scouts. The National Office began a program of integrating local councils in 1940, which was largely complete in 1948.

Recent history (1950-1990)

Boy Scouting in Alabama

In the 1990s, the Boy Scouts of America went through a restructuring in an attempt to reduce manpower, and in several states small historic Councils were merged into a larger supercouncil. The new Greater Alabama Council is an example of such a supercouncil.

There are eight BSA local councils serving Scouts in Alabama today.

  1. Alabama-Florida Council - BSA Council #3 serving youth in Southern Alabama and the Florida Panhandle, with offices in Dothan AL.
  2. Black Warrior Council - serves youth in Central Alabama with main offices in Tuscaloosa. The council's name refers to Chief Tuscaloosa whose name means Black Warrior.
  3. Chattahoochee Council - serves Scouts in Alabama and Georgia, with the Council office located in Columbus, Georgia. The council's name refers to the Chattahoochee River, which flows through Georgia, Alabama, and Florida.
  4. Choctaw Area Council - serving scouts in East Mississippi and West Alabama, headquarters in Meridian MS.
  5. Greater Alabama Council - BSA Council #1 serving youth in Northern Alabama and the Birmingham metropolitan area.
  6. Gulf Coast Council - serving youth in Southern Alabama and the Florida Panhandle, with offices in Pensacola FL.
  7. Mobile Area Council - serving youth in Southern Alabama and the Mobile metropolitan area.
  8. Tukabatchee Area Council - serving youth in the Montgomery metropolitan area in south central Alabama.

Girl Scouting in Alabama

There are six Girl Scout council offices in Alabama.

Scouting Activities

Traditional Boy Scout Camps

Sequoyah Sidewinder - scout camp waterslide

Traditional summer camps operated by Alabama area boy scout councils. They typically feature a week long scouting adventure, educational, camping and merit badge program. They are usually available for youth group and family camping the rest of the year

  1. Camp Alaflo - (Alabama-Florida Council) primary summer camp facility located in Coffee County. Over 600 acres of rolling hills, tall pines, two aquatics lakes and true southern hospitality.
  2. Camp Sequoyah - (Greater Alabama Council) - a 1,447 acres traditional camp in east central Alabama, near Cheaha State Park. Part of Frank Spain Scout Reservation and home of the Sequoyah Sidewinder.
  3. Camp Horne (Black Warrior Council) - 496-acre main council camp located in east Tuscaloosa County.
  4. Camp Comer (Greater Alabama Council) - main attractions include the cool summer temperature, beautiful Lake Republic, rocks, and a mountain atmosphere.
  5. Camp FGL (Chattahoochee Council) - 600 acres with over 26 miles of lake shore it sits on Lake West Point with direct access to the Chattahoochee River. Modern primary summer camp facility for this council located on the Alabama/ Georgia state line near many local attractions, parks, trails and museums.
  6. Camp Binachi (Choctaw Area Council) - a wonderful retreat out among the trees and nature in East Mississippi.
  7. Spanish Trail Scout Reservation (Gulf Coast Council) - one of the largest wilderness boy scout camp in the southeast. Located near Pensacola FL with canoeing, fishing and swimming.
  8. Maubila Scout Reservation (Mobile Area Council) - 400 acre traditional wilderness boy scout camp near Jackson AL.
  9. Camp Tukabatchee (Tukabatchee Area Council) - one of two scout camps located on the 1000-acre Warner Scout Reservation a modern lakefront scouting facility in Autauga County, Alabama.

Recreational Camps

  1. Camp Jack Wright ( GAC) - located in the Roupes Valley, adjacent to Tannehill Ironworks Historical State Park.
  2. Camp Gallant (Chattahoochee Council) - camporee facility on West Point Lake.
  3. Camp Pine Mountain (Chattahoochee Council) - 1920's boy scout camp used for both primitive camping and cub scout events located near West Point GA.
  4. Camp Hobbs ( TAC) - cub scout resident camp in Autauga County, Alabama on the Warner Scout Reservation.

Youth Group Camps

  • Camp Arrowhead - CLOSED - operated from the early 1940's to 1971 and was located on the Coosa River near Clanton, AL.
  • Camp McKenzie - In 2006, when the Birmingham Area Council Boy Scouts was dissolved, Camp McKenzie became a interdenominational Christian camp named Camp Winnataska.
  • Camp Zinn - in Dekalb County, operated from 1931 to 1965. On September 8, 1966 meeting, the Official Board of Camp Lee,a United Methodist Church organization, purchase the camp from the Choccolocco Council, and renamed it Camp Lee.
  • Camp Westmoreland - CLOSED

High Adventure

  1. Cheaha State Park, Highest Point in Alabama, is a 2719 mountain-top wilderness preserve. Facilities include a 30-unit resort inn, restaurant, vacation cottages, chalets, modern campground, picnic areas, biking trails, hiking trails and lots of beautiful scenery. One of the most popular destinations in the state park system. Trailhead to many of the best state hiking trails.
  2. Camp Jackson ( GAC) - a 515-acre primitive camp located 5 miles east of Scottsboro on the Tennessee River at Jones Cove.
  3. White Bluff Scout Reservation ( BWC) - primitive boy scout base camp for Black Warrior River water treks.
  4. Camp O'Rear ( BWC) - a 90-acre primitive-style facility located in Jasper, AL.
  5. Camp Pushmataha - is the council's weekend primitive facility, and was at one time the Council Camp. It is located in Citronelle, AL.
  6. Wheeler NWR is a 35,000-acre wildlife refuge on the Tennessee River near Decatur AL. This wilderness of deep river channels and tupelo swamps is home to over 500 unique species of bird, fish, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. River treks, camping and hiking Trails.

State Landmarks and Museums

  1. Tannehill Ironworks Historical State Park directly adjacent to Camp Jack Wright: With more than 1,500 acres in three counties set aside for hiking, camping and outdoor recreation. A miniature railroad chugs through the pines. From spring through fall, the blacksmith, miller and craftsmen demonstrate their trades. Craft shops occupy restored pioneer cabins and artisans chat with visitors from their front porches. Steeped in history, Tannehill feels timeless. The cotton gin, pioneer farm and working gristmill preserve a long-gone way of life. Hiking trails retrace historic roadways. Artifacts of Alabama’s 19th century iron industry displayed in the Iron and Steel Museum put in perspective the massive stone furnaces, Tannehill’s awe-inspiring centerpiece. Alabama State Parks
  2. USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park (BB-60) - this mighty World War II battleship is today a floating museum hosting many scouting events and groups.
  3. Anniston History Museums includes the Berman Museum of ancient world treasures, Natural History Museum, and several military warfare museums.

Historic Adventure Trails

  1. Pinhoti National Recreation Trail - Alabama-Georgia Hiking Adventure on a long-distance trail, 335 miles long, it is the longest trail for both states with many scenic landmarks.